Vision Maker Media is bringing Native storytelling and film to life at the seventh biennial Vision Maker Film Festival. More than 30 new films by diverse filmmakers will be showcased at the Mary Riepma Ross Media Arts Center in Lincoln, Nebraska, April 20-26.
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4.20.184.26.18

VISION MAKER FILM FESTIVAL

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Vision Maker Media is bringing Native storytelling and film to life at the seventh biennial Vision Maker Film Festival. More than 30 new films by diverse filmmakers will be showcased at the Mary Riepma Ross Media Arts Center in Lincoln, Nebraska, April 20-26.

Synopsis

"We Are All Related” is the theme of the seventh biennial Vision Maker Film Festival. The theme is a conceptual translation from the Lakota language—Mitákuye Oyás’iŋ—a commonly used expression indicating the Lakota’s relationships to each other and in the world.

Individual film admission is at regular Ross prices.

Individual tickets can be purchased online and at the Ross box office.

A festival pass will be available at the Ross box office for $25, good for admission to all screenings in the festival. The festival pass is not available online. Present your festival pass at the box office to receive a ticket for the screening you are attending. The Festival Pass can not be used to purchase tickets online.  

Visit the VIsion Maker Media website for more information.

FRIDAY, APRIL 20

5:30-6:30 p.m.
Frank Blythe Award for Media Excellence Reception 
Opening reception and presentation of the Frank Blythe Award for Media Excellence to Buffy Sainte-Marie (Cree) and Harriett Skye (Hunkpapa Lakota).
In person: Buffy Sainte-Marie (Cree) and Jessica Skye Paul (Hunkpapa Lakota)
.

7:00 p.m.
RUMBLE: The Indians Who Rocked the World
(Canada, 2017, 103 min.)
RUMBLE: The Indians Who Rocked the World tells the story of a profound, essential, and, until now, missing chapter in the history of American music: the Indigenous influence. Featuring music icons Charley Patton (Cherokee), Mildred Bailey (Coeur d’Alene), Link Wray (Shawnee), Jimi Hendrix (Cherokee), Jesse Ed Davis (Kiowa), Buffy Sainte-Marie (Cree), Robbie Robertson (Mohawk), and others.
In person: Buffy Sainte-Marie (Cree)

9:00 p.m.
When They Awake
(Canada, 2017, 90 min.)
WHEN THEY AWAKE is a vibrant celebration of Indigenous Canadian musicians. From Tanya Tagaq to A Tribe Called Red, WHEN THEY AWAKE is a music revolution right before your eyes.

SATURDAY, APRIL 21

1:00 p.m.
Big Sky Native Filmmakers Documentary Challenge Shorts
(48 min)
Includes 9 short films: 
GENERATIONS
HEADDRESS
HINOWU HAND GAMES 
KA PUA 
PROTECT 
QAMANIQ
UNITED BY WATER
TURQUOISE
IN THE BEGINNING WAS WATER AND SKY

3:00 p.m.
A Redemption Story
(USA, 2017, 10 min) - Q+A
A Redemption Story follows Leo Yankton (Oglala Lakota) and how he contributed in efforts to protect the water on the Standing Rock reservation, and continues to find ways to have a positive impact with Native County and the rest of the world.
In Person: Leo Yankton (Oglala Lakota)

On a Knife Edge 
(USA, 2017, 90 min.)
On a Knife Edge is a coming-of-age story of George Dull Knife, a Lakota teenager growing up on the Pine Ridge Reservation in South Dakota. George is being raised by his single father, Guy Dull Knife, Jr. – a veteran of both Vietnam and the Occupation of Wounded Knee – and is inspired by his family legacy of survivors and leaders to help shape his own generation’s fight for social justice.

5:00 p.m.
The Violence of a Civilization Without Secrets
(USA, 2017, 10 min.) - Q+A
An urgent reflection on indigenous sovereignty, the undead violence of museum archives, and postmortem justice through the case of the "Kennewick Man," a prehistoric Paleo-American man whose remains were found in Kennewick, Washington, in 1996.
In Person: Adam Khalil (Ojibway) and Zach Khalil (Ojibway)

INAATE/SE/ [it shines a certain way. to a certain place./it flies. falls./] 
(USA, 2016, 75 min.) - Q+A
This experimental documentary by Zack and Adam Khalil explores the Ojibwe story of the Seven Fires Prophecy, which has been interpreted as predicting the arrival of the Europeans in North America and the subsequent destruction they caused. The film examines the relationship between cultural tradition and modern indigenous identity.
In Person: Adam Khalil (Ojibway) and Zach Khalil (Ojibway)

7:00 p.m.
Return to Rainy Mountain
(USA, 2017, 30 min.) - Q+A
Return to Rainy Mountain tells the story of N. Scott Momaday. It is a personal account of his life and legacy told in his voice, and in the voice of his daughter Jill. Momaday speaks of his Kiowa roots and the sacred and important things that have shaped his life.
In Person: Jill Momaday (Kiowa)

Ohiyesa: The Soul of an Indian
(USA, 2018, 57 min.) - Q+A
This documentary follows Kate Beane, a young Dakota woman, as she examines the life of her celebrated relative, Charles Eastman (Ohiyesa). Biography and journey come together as Kate traces Eastman’s path—from traditional Dakota boyhood, education at Dartmouth College, and later as a physician, author, lecturer and Native American advocate.
In Person: Syd Beane (Flandreau Santee Sioux)

9:00 p.m.
Through the Repellent Fence
(USA, 2017, 74 min.)
THROUGH THE REPELLENT FENCE follows Native American art collective Postcommodity as they construct Repellent Fence, a two-mile long outdoor artwork straddling the U.S.-Mexico border a mile in each direction and suturing the region back together.

SUNDAY, APRIL 22

1:00 p.m.
Kayak to Klemtu
(Canada, 2017, 90 min.) - Q+A
14-year-old Ella is determined to travel the length of the Inside Passage, along the shores of the Great Bear Rainforest by kayak in order to testify against a proposed pipeline that would see oil tanker traffic through her beloved homeland waters.
In Person: Zoe Leigh Hopkins (Heiltsuk/Mohawk)

3:00 p.m.
Keep Talking
(USA, 2017, 79 min.)
Four Alaska Native women are fighting to save the threatened language of Kodiak Alutiq, an endangered language spoken by less than 40 remaining fluent Native Elders. KEEP TALKING follows these women and their small community as they travel to the remote Afognak Island to start teaching the children Alutiiq.

5:00 p.m.
Family Ingredients: Wisconsin - Fiddlehead Fern
(USA, 2017, 26 min.)
Kaua’i farmer Valerie Kaneshiro, a mixture of Japanese and Native American, was raised on the Lac Courte Oreilles Ojibwe reservation in Wisconsin. Forced to leave her home at 15, Valerie tells a story of loss and re-discovery while sharing an ingredient to a cultural dish found in Wisconsin and Hawai­i.

Growing Native: Oklahoma
(USA, 2017, 60 min.) - Q+A
Moses Brings Plenty guides this episode of Growing Native, on a journey to Oklahoma’s past and present. What he discovers among the many faces of Oklahoma culture is the determination, values and respect that tribes have brought to this land, once called Indian Territory. 
In Person: Charles “Boots” Kennedye (Kiowa)

7:00 p.m.
Dawnland
(USA, 2018, 86 min.) - Q+A
For decades, child welfare authorities have been removing Native American children from their homes to save them from being Indian. DAWNLAND goes behind-the-scenes as this historic body grapples with difficult truths, redefines reconciliation, and charts a new course for state and tribal relations.
In Person: Tracy Rector (Choctaw/Seminole)

9:00 p.m.
Street Cred
(USA, 2018, 56 min.) - Q+A
"Street Cred" is a new docu-drama done in the style of a reality show. It challenges eight inner city youth (18-22) to apply their inherent grit and street smarts for a chance to get their own film funded and a dream internship.
In Person: Sultan Sharrief.

MONDAY, APRIL 23

5:00 p.m.
The Mayors of Shiprock
(USA, 2017, 52 min.)
For over three years, the Northern Diné Youth Committee has worked to make their hometown of Shiprock, New Mexico a better place. Their founder, Graham Beyale has led the charge.

Growing Native: Northwest
(USA, 2014, 60 min.) - Q+A
Chris Eyre (Cheyenne/Arapaho) ventures to the Pacific Northwest to capture the stories of ongoing traditions and perseverance of its original inhabitants; from Canoe Journey, to totem poles, language preservation and traditional crafts, Eyre discovers what it means to be Growing Native.
In Person: Charles “Boots” Kennedye (Kiowa)

7:00 p.m.
New Muslim Cool
(USA, 2009, 90 min.) - Q+A
New Muslim Cool follows the life of Hamza Perez, a Puerto Rican-American Rap artist who converted to Islam after he decided to quit his life as a drug dealer. Hamza spends his time on the streets and jail cells spreading the message of Islam to at-risk youth and communities.
In Person: Jennifer Maytorenna Taylor

9:00 p.m.
Maria
(USA, Aotearoa, 15 min.) - Q+A
The matriarch of a large Polynesian family lies bedridden and silent, unable or unwilling to speak after a long illness. When a family crisis strikes, Nan Maria gets unexpected help as she struggles to reunite her fractured family.
In Person: Karin Williams (Cook Islands)

Out of State
(USA, 2017, 82 min.)
David and Hale are two incarcerated criminals who share a common background: their Hawaiian roots. Telling the story of two men who discover their indigenous traditions from behind bars, OUT OF STATE follows David and Hale as they return back to Hawaiian life and uncover the challenges that await them as they adjust to life outside of prison.

TUESDAY, APRIL 24

5:00 p.m.
More than a Word
(USA, 2017, 70 min.)
More Than A Word analyzes the Washington football team and their use of the derogatory term R*dskins. Using interviews from both those in favor of changing the name and those against, More Than A Word presents a deeper analysis of the many issues surrounding the Washington team name.

7:00 p.m.
Mele Murals
(USA, 2016, 64 min.) - Q+A
Mele Murals is a documentary on the transformative power of modern graffiti art and ancient Hawaiian culture for a new generation of Native Hawaiians. At the center of the story are two renowned street artists - Estria Miyashiro (aka Estria) and John Hina (aka Prime) - a group of Native Hawaiian youth, and the rural community of Waimea.
In Person: Tadashi Nakamura

9:00 p.m.
RUMBLE: The Indians Who Rocked the World
(USA, 2017, 103 min.)
RUMBLE: The Indians Who Rocked the World tells the story of a profound, essential, and, until now, missing chapter in the history of American music: the Indigenous influence. Featuring music icons Charley Patton (Cherokee), Mildred Bailey (Coeur d’Alene), Link Wray (Shawnee), Jimi Hendrix (Cherokee), Jesse Ed Davis (Kiowa), Buffy Sainte-Marie (Cree), Robbie Robertson (Mohawk), and others.

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 25

5:00 p.m.
Skindigenous: Hawaii
(USA, 2018, 22 min.)
SKINDIGENOUS is a thirteen-part documentary series on the art of tattooing, as practiced by indigenous peoples around the world. If Keone Nunes had never picked up the tools and answered the call to master of kakau, there would likely be no traditional tattooing in Hawaii today.

ANTI-ETHNOGRAPHY SHORTS
(70 min)
Includes 14 short films: 
SIOUX GHOST DANCE (1894, 1 min)
WELCOME TO THE THIRD WORLD (2004, 2 min)
THE LAUGHING ALIGATOR (1979, 27 min)
OVERWEIGHT WITH CROOKED TEETH (1997, 5 min)
AUNTIE BEACHRESS - ARE YOU LOOKING AT ME? (2015, 15 sec)
INSTANT IDENTITY RITUAL (2007, 2 min)
BIZARRE THANKSGIVING PERFORMANCE RITUAL (2013, 2 min)
SHOOTING GERONIMO (2007, 11 min)
AUNTIE BEACHRESS - LOVE'S ALL NATIVE MEN (2015, 15 sec)
AUNTIE BEACHRESS - LAKOTA LANGUAGE CHALLENGE (2015, 15 sec)
WAWA (2014, 6 min)
AUNTIE BEACHRESS - ONLY BORING PEOPLE GET BORED (2015, 14 sec)
DANCE TO MISS CHIEF (2010, 5 min)
AUNTIE BEACHRESS - LIFE'S STRUGGLES (2015, 14 sec)

7:00 p.m.
Dodging Bullets: Stories of Survivors of Historical Trauma
(98 min) - Q+A
Native Americans have dodged bullets since the first contact with Europeans. This film brings a cross-generational sampling of Indigenous people, researchers, and politicians to reveal stunning reasons for their disproportionately high incidences of health and social issues. This collection of remarkable stories, names Historical Trauma as the unique and insidious part of the generic code that resilient Native American populations are still finding ways to dodge.
In Person: Bob Trench and Mike Her Many Horses (Oglala Lakota)

9:00 p.m.
Waru
(2017, Aotearoa, 86 min.)
Eight female Māori directors have each contributed a ten minute vignette, presented as a continuous shot in real time, that unfolds around the tangi (funeral) of a small boy (Waru) who died at the hands of his caregiver. The vignettes are all subtly interlinked and each follow one of eight female Māori lead characters during the same moment in time as they come to terms with Waru's death and try to find a way forward in their community. In Māori, waru means 8. Rating: M for Mature Audiences.

THURSDAY, APRIL 26

5:00 p.m.
Skindigenous: Alaska
(USA, 2018, 22 min.)
SKINDIGENOUS is a thirteen-part documentary series on the art of tattooing, as practiced by indigenous peoples around the world. Marjorie Tahbone, an Alaskan artist of Inupiaq heritage, was first among the living women of her family to get her traditional chin tattoo.

We Breathe Again
(USA, 2017, 57 min.)
We Breathe Again intimately explores the lives of five Alaska Native people, each confronting the impacts of historic and contemporary trauma. Reflected in the northern lights and the city streetlights, from the ice roads to the asphalt, the characters battle for personal healing, hoping to break new trail for their families and their communities to follow.

7:00 p.m.
Metal Road
(USA, 2017, 27 min.)
For decades, thousands of Navajos worked the railroads, maintaining the trans-continental network. Metal Road explores the dynamics of livelihood, family, and the railroads through the lens of a Navajo trackman.

Moroni for President
(USA, 2018, 78 min.)
Moroni Benally is running for the presidency of the Navajo Nation, the largest Native American nation in the U.S. Young, gay, Mormon, and highly educated, he sets out to confront the political establishment in a homecoming that challenges what he both imagined home, and himself, to be.

9:00 p.m.
Kayak to Klemtu
(Canada, 2017, 90 min.)
14-year-old Ella is determined to travel the length of the Inside Passage, along the shores of the Great Bear Rainforest by kayak in order to testify against a proposed pipeline that would see oil tanker traffic through her beloved homeland waters.

Schedule subject to change


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Showing

Apr 20 through Apr 26

4.22 Sun 1:00, 3:00, 5:00, 7:00, 9:00 p.m.
4.23 Mon 5:00, 7:00, 9:00 p.m.
4.24 Tue 5:00, 7:00, 9:00 p.m.
4.25 Wed 5:00, 7:00, 9:00 p.m.
4.26 Thu 5:00, 7:00, 9:00 p.m.
nr

Many of the films shown at The Ross are not rated due to the prohibitive cost of acquiring a rating from the Motion Picture Association of America. Consequently, as many of these films contain graphic content, viewer discretion is advised.

Ticket Information

Evening Prices

$9.50
Adults
$7.00
Students
$7.00
Children
$7.50
Military
$7.50
Seniors
$6.50
Members
$5.00
UNL Students

Matinee Prices

$7.50
Adults
$6.50
Students
$6.50
Children
$6.50
Military
$7.00
Seniors
$6.00
Members
$5.00
UNL Students
  • Children are 12 and under. Seniors are 60 and older
  • Students and Military must show a valid ID to receive discount
  • We accept cash, check, NCard, Visa, and Mastercard
  • The Ross Box Office opens 30 minutes before the first screening of the day
  • Assistive listening headsets and closed caption devices available for select titles. Check the individual film pages or inquire at the box office for details.

Tickets are available for purchase online.

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